The Decolonizing Diet Project (DDP) was a pilot study of the relationship between humans and Indigenous foods of the Great Lakes Region. Dr. Martin Reinhardt, associate professor of Native American Studies served as the principal investigator and a research subject for the DDP.

The planning phase of the project ran from 2010 to 2012. The implementation phase ran from March 25, 2012 to March 24, 2013. The analysis and reporting phase was from March 25, 2013 to Summer of 2014.

Dr. Reinhardt authored a chapter in the following publication about the outcomes of the DDP:

Reinhardt, M. (2015). “Spirit food: A multidimensional overview of the Decolonizing Diet Project”. Indigenous Innovation: Universalities and Peculiarities, eds., E. Sumida Huaman and B. Sriraman. Rotterdam: Sense.

Reinhardt co-authored a DDP Cookbook with fellow research subjects Leora Lancaster and April Lindala:

Reinhardt, M., Lancaster, L., and Lindala, A. (2016). Decolonizing Diet Project Cookbook. Featuring Indigenous food recipes from the Great Lakes Region. Marquette, MI: Northern Michigan University, Center for Native American Studies. Reinhardt is currently working on another chapter for an upcoming publication which will feature his and his wife's (Tina Moses) reflections about the DDP.

A DDP Three Year Follow-Up Study was recently conducted by K. Nim Reinhardt, a senior nursing student and Indian Health Services Scholar/McNair Scholar at NMU (and yes, she is Dr. Reinhardt's older daughter too). Findings from this study may be submitted for publication soon also.

The DDP continues to influence many other projects and has a wide following on Facebook and in communities around the world. Dr. Reinhardt continues to present on the project and will be looking at future projects related to the outcomes of the DDP.

We would like to thank all of those who have assisted with the DDP over the years and would be more than happy to answer any questions about the DDP via email at: mreinhar@nmu.edu





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Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Crab Apple Syrup






Yesterday, Sam Hasek and I harvested a mkak (birch bark basket) full of crab apples from the tree near the Center for Native American Studies here on campus. I boiled them down whole for about an hour and a half last night, and then I strained it through a white t-shirt. What I found when I removed the cloth this morning was a thick syrupy liquid. It tastes very good, a bit tart and a bit sweet. I think it will tatse very good over venison steaks, wild rice, and many other indigenous foods. I think if I boiled it down a bit more, I would be able to seperate the pectin from the juice more, but it tastes so good as it is, I may just leave it. I will put the fiberous materials out for the deer this evening. Next time, I will remove stems and seeds before boiling it down so I can use the fibrous material left over as crab apple sauce. The last thing I did this morning was to mix some maple syrup with the crab apple syrup. Mmmmmm, was that good! The mixture of 2 parts crab apple syrup to 1 part maple syrup was a bit sweet, so for those folks who like it more tart, they may want to start with a 3 to 1 mixture.

3 comments:

  1. Ai! I don't have your chokecherries - when I checked on Thursday, there was enough for a small jar. I thought I'd harvest them fresh Sunday, and , well, it's Sunday and they are all gone - the birds ate them - which is only right as this was their land before we moved on it, so I'm sure their eating patterns are long established. But...my apologies!

    Also, I'm sure you will be interested in attending White Earth's Wild Food Summit some year soon: http://wildfoodsummit.org I was there briefly once, and it was wonderfully packed with information.

    And..I recently learned berries from showy/false Solomon's Seal are edible (though mildly cathartic), and the last few weeks I've been seeing a lot of them around. Let us know if you try any....I'm not brave enough yet.

    Finally, if you know of any good (read: safe) bogs to go cranberry picking this time of year, are you willing to share directions on how to get there?

    I won't hog your comments page all the time - but there's so much going on out in the woods right now with this stuff. :) Please feel free to delete whatever you feel is not relevant to the project.

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  2. Are crabapples native to the americas?Helen in sunvalley, nv

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  3. There is only one specie that is native to the Great Lakes according to the USDA. That is the American Sweet Crabapple.

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