The Decolonizing Diet Project (DDP) was a pilot study of the relationship between humans and Indigenous foods of the Great Lakes Region. Dr. Martin Reinhardt, associate professor of Native American Studies served as the principal investigator and a research subject for the DDP.

The planning phase of the project ran from 2010 to 2012. The implementation phase ran from March 25, 2012 to March 24, 2013. The analysis and reporting phase was from March 25, 2013 to Summer of 2014.

Dr. Reinhardt authored a chapter in the following publication about the outcomes of the DDP:

Reinhardt, M. (2015). “Spirit food: A multidimensional overview of the Decolonizing Diet Project”. Indigenous Innovation: Universalities and Peculiarities, eds., E. Sumida Huaman and B. Sriraman. Rotterdam: Sense.

Reinhardt co-authored a DDP Cookbook with fellow research subjects Leora Lancaster and April Lindala:

Reinhardt, M., Lancaster, L., and Lindala, A. (2016). Decolonizing Diet Project Cookbook. Featuring Indigenous food recipes from the Great Lakes Region. Marquette, MI: Northern Michigan University, Center for Native American Studies. Reinhardt is currently working on another chapter for an upcoming publication which will feature his and his wife's (Tina Moses) reflections about the DDP.

A DDP Three Year Follow-Up Study was recently conducted by K. Nim Reinhardt, a senior nursing student and Indian Health Services Scholar/McNair Scholar at NMU (and yes, she is Dr. Reinhardt's older daughter too). Findings from this study may be submitted for publication soon also.

The DDP continues to influence many other projects and has a wide following on Facebook and in communities around the world. Dr. Reinhardt continues to present on the project and will be looking at future projects related to the outcomes of the DDP.

We would like to thank all of those who have assisted with the DDP over the years and would be more than happy to answer any questions about the DDP via email at: mreinhar@nmu.edu





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Monday, October 31, 2011

Moose Meat Burgers Last Night

We enjoyed some moose meat on the grill last night thanks to family members. We also did some shopping over the weekend and yesterday and found organic free range turkey, bison, whitefish, walleye, pumpkins, squash, pure cranberry concentrate, morels, black walnuts, and ground venison. I have decided to include Domestic Turkey and Pekin Duck as part of the DDP eligible foods list. Domestic Turkey is the same specie as wild turkey. Pekin Duck is the same specie as Mallard. We will be opening the DDP group site soon, and will have our food lists posted there. We strongly encourage the public to offer any corrections about the lists. I recently sent a letter to the editor of Marquette Monthly Magazine, and in it I suggested that if potential food donors want to donate quail (among other frozen or dried food items) that they contact me. I appreciate George Lindquist's call to inform us that quail are not indigenous to the Great Lakes Region. There are two birds often called quail that are indigenous however, these include the Northern Bobwhite, and the Grouse. We will be using the Avibase bird database as our primary source for determining eligible bird species for the DDP.  The link is included on our blog under DDP links, or you can click on the following url address:  http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/avibase.jsp?lang=EN&pg=home

2 comments:

  1. I gave a lecture last week that included discussion about moose and how the environment is affecting their health and population. Liver flukes and parasites are taking a toll and a lot of animals are migrating north to avoid the warming lower 48. What is the word up your way on them?

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  2. Be careful about the domestic turkey, etc.. those animals may be the same species, but they are still different. Full of hormones, antibiotics, etc. and can barely (if at all) walk due to their sheer size. Even if they're free range, they still live a miserable life and eat who-knows-what to grow that large. Somehow, that does not seem the same as killing and eating a wild turkey, both nutritionally and morally.

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