The Decolonizing Diet Project (DDP) was a pilot study of the relationship between humans and Indigenous foods of the Great Lakes Region. Dr. Martin Reinhardt, associate professor of Native American Studies served as the principal investigator and a research subject for the DDP.

The planning phase of the project ran from 2010 to 2012. The implementation phase ran from March 25, 2012 to March 24, 2013. The analysis and reporting phase was from March 25, 2013 to Summer of 2014.

Dr. Reinhardt authored a chapter in the following publication about the outcomes of the DDP:

Reinhardt, M. (2015). “Spirit food: A multidimensional overview of the Decolonizing Diet Project”. Indigenous Innovation: Universalities and Peculiarities, eds., E. Sumida Huaman and B. Sriraman. Rotterdam: Sense.

Reinhardt co-authored a DDP Cookbook with fellow research subjects Leora Lancaster and April Lindala:

Reinhardt, M., Lancaster, L., and Lindala, A. (2016). Decolonizing Diet Project Cookbook. Featuring Indigenous food recipes from the Great Lakes Region. Marquette, MI: Northern Michigan University, Center for Native American Studies. Reinhardt is currently working on another chapter for an upcoming publication which will feature his and his wife's (Tina Moses) reflections about the DDP.

A DDP Three Year Follow-Up Study was recently conducted by K. Nim Reinhardt, a senior nursing student and Indian Health Services Scholar/McNair Scholar at NMU (and yes, she is Dr. Reinhardt's older daughter too). Findings from this study may be submitted for publication soon also.

The DDP continues to influence many other projects and has a wide following on Facebook and in communities around the world. Dr. Reinhardt continues to present on the project and will be looking at future projects related to the outcomes of the DDP.

We would like to thank all of those who have assisted with the DDP over the years and would be more than happy to answer any questions about the DDP via email at: mreinhar@nmu.edu





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Monday, April 30, 2012

May 10th DDP Gathering

Our next DDP gathering is on May 10th at the Grace United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. It will be from 6-8pm. We will have a potluck, and an opportunity for folks to trade DDP items. So, bring a dish to pass and anything that you would like to trade for other DDP stuff.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Cattail Foraging April 26th

Instead of having a pot-luck in on April 26th, we decided to go out foraging for cattail sprouts. We will meet at the gas station at the intersection of 553 and 35 in Gwinn around 5:30pm. Then we will head south on 35 toward Escanba. The area we will be foraging in is just north of McFarland near where the railroad crosses 35. We will be out there until 8pm so if you can't be at the gas station at 5:30pm, and just want to find us later that will work. Plan on wearing gloves, hip-waders or boots, old clothes, and a hat. Bring a knife and a bucket/basket, or even a plastic bag to haul your cattails home in. We will bring band-aids and a first aid kit just in case. We will also bring some DDP snack foods and bottles of water.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

DDP Gathering 4/12/12

Anishinaabe ethnobotanist Dr. Scott Heron will be joining us at our DDP gathering this thursday in the fellowship hall of Grace United Methodist Church. This is a pot luck event, so bring a DDP eligible dish and be prepared to tell us how you made it. In fact, to help with journaling afterward, please post your recipes for what you bring in the recipe forum at the DDP Group Site. Don't forget that we must have everything prepared before we get there as we will not be able to warm anything up. Please bring your own place settings.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Our Family Foods

Here is an email I received from Becky Ross at the Nash Finch company which is the parent company of Our Family Foods regarding their canned vegetables:

Mr. Martin Reinhardt,

Thank you for contacting Our Family Foods with your question.

The canned vegetable products are made from non-genetically modified varieties of vegetables which are harvested, sorted, manufactured, packed and transported by us to avoid commingling with other crops.

We hope this information is helpful.

Sincerely,

Becky Ross
Nash Finch Consumer Response Specialist
1.800.433.2004  Ext. 129
bross@consumerscience.com